10 Comments
May 2Liked by Elizabeth Smoots

All of these evils of Marxism/Communism have come about because we are now a pagan country. We have rejected Christianity. More explicitly we have rejected Jesus Christ and His teachings in favor of ourselves and this has brought about all the evil now prevalent in the U.S. and the world. I do take hope however that there are people in this country and abroad who continue to point this out and have taken to heart His words "In the world you will have tribulation, but be of good cheer, for I have overcome the world" John 16:33

Expand full comment
author

Thank you for your comment. Marxism is the antithesis of "One nation under God." It's intent is to destroy all religion and replace it with "socialist man." Paul Kengor's book "The Devil and Karl Marx" covers this topic in detail. Have you watched the documentary film "Letter to the American Church," available at https://lettertotheamericanchurch.com/? It goes over the Marxist capture of American churches.

Expand full comment
May 2Liked by Elizabeth Smoots

I find it ironic that this binary of oppressed and oppressor is accepted without critique, when it is nothing more than a social construction, while the biological fact of our chromosomes is not socially constructed and yet the left refuses to acknowledge it in favor of an imaginary scale of gender. But then again, what did Lewis Carrol say about consistency?

Expand full comment
author
May 2·edited May 2Author

Exactly. The far left criticizes others for what it does itself. This is sometimes called "the iron law of woke projection." The key point is that an ideology that has an oppressor vs. oppressed worldview is Marxist. Critical race theory, critical gender theory and colonial/decolonial theory all have this worldview and are Marxist.

Expand full comment
May 2Liked by Elizabeth Smoots

I have not seen the film but as an orthodox Catholic I am well aware of the Marxist capture of Catholic clergy most notably in the hierarchy all the way to the Vatican.

Expand full comment
author

Paul Kengor's book "The Devil and Karl Marx" discusses how the Catholic Church was initially resistant to Marxist capture but eventually succumbed to it over time.

Expand full comment
May 3Liked by Elizabeth Smoots

It’s good to see some of the beliefs and objectives of communism laid out in simplified form. Perhaps a handbook that lays out the contrasts between communism and democracy would help people see what’s in it for them. Especially the things that are held near and dear — for example private property, the family, freedom — could be seen in a different light in these times of moral crises if they see the comparisons.

I wonder if schools do an adequate job of helping young students understand the differences. I recall, many years ago, that one of the main textbooks parents who were home educating their children used the Home School Manual by Theodore Wade, which included a full 12-page course of study, K-12, where grade 12 had the topic Communism vs Democracy in its Social Studies section.

Expand full comment
author

Thanks for your suggestion. I have been thinking of doing something along those lines in an upcoming issue of 2026. I agree that the majority of people don't have a clear understanding of the differences.

Expand full comment
May 2Liked by Elizabeth Smoots

Point of clarification: Are the words flanked by red vertical bars on left side direct quotes from Marx?

If so, it would be helpful to reference where in his writings they came from

Thank you.

Expand full comment
author
May 2·edited May 2Author

Thanks for your question. The lead paragraph of this issue of "2026" explains that all of the quotes come directly from "The Communist Manifesto" by Karl Marx. The edition of the book that I bought is only 88 pages long and serves as a good source for quoting directly from Marx. The exact page numbers of each quote may vary from edition to edition. The red bars are used on Substack to identify block quotes. Anything flanked by red vertical bars in my newsletters is a quotation. [An exception is when I use brackets to add my own comments about the quotation as shown in this sentence.]

Expand full comment